Priority Purple
More Bling for the Eight

The Priority Eight from Priority Bicycles is a fun bike to ride, and to customize! My earlier post on Blinging Out the Priority Eight gives three suggestions for adding a splash of your favorite color. Now I’m back with three more that’ll make your bike as delightful to look at as it is to ride. 

Bottle Cage

First up is a bottle cage, which I sourced in purple from Toronto Cycles. Installation couldn’t be simpler. Unscrew your bottle-cage bolts, align the cage on the downtube, and screw back the bolts. Don’t overtighten! Firmly snug using the short end of the wrench for leverage is all you need.

Firmly snug on those bolts. Don’t overtighten. Minimal leverage.

Firmly snug on those bolts. Don’t overtighten. Minimal leverage.

Cages are available from Toronto Cycles in a variety of colors. Scroll toward the bottom of their cage page to see the ones in anodized aluminum. You already have a Priority Bicycles water bottle, right? So get a cage in your favorite color, and make that empty space in your frame count for something.

Stem Cap

Swap your stem cap to put some color where you can see it while on the bike and pedaling. The stem cap is a small disk atop your stem, with a bolt in the center. The stock combination is a black cap and silver bolt. I chose a purple cap and bolt from Salsa Cycles to fit in with my color scheme. 

Unscrew the center bolt. Remove the old cap. Put on the new cap, and fasten it in place by screwing down the new center bolt. Do not overtighten! Aim for gently snug. Do not touch any of the other bolts on your stem, and do not wrench down hard when tightening the center-bolt. 

Remove the stock cap.

Remove the stock cap.

And put on the bling!

And put on the bling!

I sourced my Salsa-brand top cap from Universal Cycles. Salsa-brand parts are widely available, and any brick-and-morter or online bike shop will be able to source them for you. Also worth a look are the KCNC top caps that are available from Jenson USA. I like KCNC’s shape, but Salsa makes the purple. 

Pedals!

Purple pedals! This was a hard one, because the stock pedals on the Eight are precisely the type of pinned, BMX-styles pedals I put on all my bikes. I have so much respect for Priority Bicycles over their pedal choice on the Eight that I almost couldn't bear to swap those pedals, but in the end I couldn't resist a set of Race Face Chester composite pedals in the color purple. 

Race Face Chester pedals in glorious purple

Race Face Chester pedals in glorious purple

The Chesters go for about $50. They are readily available. They go on the same as the stock pedals that you already have practice installing from when you built your Eight out of the box. Just remember that the non-drive-side pedal is reverse-threaded: turn clockwise to loosen, and anti-clockwise to tighten. (The drive-side pedal is normal-threaded, and turns in the usual manner). 

What of the Old Pedals?

Do not let those stock pedals sit idle. They are some of the nicest pedals I've seen on a stock bike, and make a wonderful gift for any young BMX riders whom you might find thrashing around the streets of your neighborhood. Mine went to a young man who'd been running a set of slippery plastic pedals, and he's thrilled at the improvement. 

Find a local BMXer to hook up with those stock pedals.

Find a local BMXer to hook up with those stock pedals.

How It All Looks 

Following is a photo showing the current state of the bike. All the items from my earlier post on Blinging Out The Priority Eight are there. As well, you can see the new items I've just added. 

The look is eye-catching, and my photo doesn't do justice

The look is eye-catching, and my photo doesn't do justice

The bottle cage does a great job of filling in the center of the main triangle, whereas the pedals add depth by extending the color scheme outward left and right. The stem cap is visible as I pedal the bike. The look is good, and it's been fun to keep an eye out for new bits of color to add to the bike.